Now Playing Tracks

smith-hadeon asked:

What was the last thing Tallgeez ate? Did he kill it himself?

tallgeezwow:

the-fist-of-argus:

tallgeezwow:

"Haha! Last thing Tallgeez ate? A one of these!" The Mighty Hunter holds up a smoldering healthstone. 

"Tallgeez does not believe it is alive, but perhaps maybe? Green stones sometimes scream when devoured. Maybe this means is extra fresh?" Tallgeez grins and big, agonizing, crunching bite, the stone shattering in his mouth like glass candy. He gives a cheerful hunter thumbs up. "Tastes like burning!"

smith-hadeon

::Ythika facepalms and rolls her eyes.:: “Geez, please…”

"Ah ha! Yes! Here, beloved. Take this for self." Tallgeez helpfully offered the other broken half of the healthstone to Ythika, belching a bit of green fire. "Many good for health. Only burns for several weeks!"

matsuoka-gou:

qwopisinthemailbox:

pillowbedhead:

sailormoonlife:

So…everyone knows anime body proportions are idealized and kind of insane.  But then I find this woman online. This amazing human with HER ANIME LEGS! SUPER LONG SKINNY ANIME LEGS! WHAT?! HOW??   

So I even found a picture of venus online to compare.  And like, now I’m going to take my stubby short legs over there to that sad corner. 

holy shit her legs are practically canon

hER LEGS ARE PEFECT AND HER COSTUME IS SO WELL MADE I WISH TO HUG YOU LADY

cosplay

turning-through-the-never asked:

TMI, IC (for any/all): If you could change one thing physically about yourself, what would it be? If you could change one non-physical thing about yourself, what would it be?

Solarine - “Honestly, I think I might like to be a few inches taller. Nothing huge, but enough to reach shelves better without needing to use a step stool. It isn’t that terrible, though, and is not a must-have. There are high heels for that, after all. As for non-physical? I might like to get rid of the nightmares. Life would be much better if I did not wake myself - and Paramonos - up with my flailing and screaming.”

Lori - “Physically? Dunno, I’m pretty good as-is. I suppose that I’d go back and not break the shit outta my left ankle. You know what happens to a bare Elf ankle when a nine-foot Troll stomps on it? Half the bone’ shelf together by metal now. I don’t like that at all. Uh. Oh, the other one! Nothing. I’m really pretty happy with who and what I am inside.”

Lhys - “My physical appearance is satisfactory. Perhaps a new hair colour, but I would be afraid to ruin my hair if it did not look good. Non-physically, it would be good to remove my innate desire for power. I have worked for many years at doing just that, but still I am afraid to touch the Arcane again. Would I be able to control myself?”

Andrisia - “Removal of the burn scar on my arm is the only requirement to return me to physical perfection. It is my mind which carries the taint. I might like to have a stronger will. Better self-control. Common sense.”

thoughtsofafuturepast:

hungrylikethewolfie:

lady-chyna:

logicislife:

jessycanhasblog:

irishsub:

Oh wow these girls are brilliant.

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor | Johann Sebastian Bach.

I wonder how long it took to practice this shit

snot-rocket1991

(Source: videohall)

strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.
I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.
You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 
Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.
Where should I look?
Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.
Should I take these bones?
Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?
Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.
Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.
Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.
Tips
Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.
That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.
I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.
You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 
Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.
Where should I look?
Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.
Should I take these bones?
Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?
Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.
Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.
Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.
Tips
Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.
That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.
I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.
You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 
Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.
Where should I look?
Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.
Should I take these bones?
Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?
Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.
Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.
Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.
Tips
Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.
That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.
I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.
You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 
Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.
Where should I look?
Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.
Should I take these bones?
Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?
Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.
Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.
Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.
Tips
Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.
That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.
I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.
You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 
Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.
Where should I look?
Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.
Should I take these bones?
Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?
Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.
Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.
Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.
Tips
Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.
That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!
Zoom Info

strangebiology:

Bone Hunting Guide

Water trickled into the eye sockets of our upturned cow skull, then onto the concrete. At six, Peter is not an expert at wielding the garden hose, and our socks and hands and pant-legs were soaked. In an attempt to clean out the insides of the bone, he had put the nozzle in the foramen magnum, the hole where the brain connects to the notochord, and now there was a stream of water where there was once an optic nerve.

I explained how the eyes have to connect to the brain, and told him the names of the different parts of a skull. Peter asked why some of the teeth were missing, and he even tried to pronounce “zygomatic arch.” Yet I always have to bribe him to get him to read with me.

I find bones to be among the most beautiful things you can have. They have history, they’re scientific, and they represent both life and death.

You can get bones from a variety of sources. You can buy them online, or at specialty shops, you can hunt or ask a hunter, or get them from your meat. If you know anyone in an animal-related profession, like a cowhand or maybe a shelter worker, I’m willing to bet that they have considerable access to bones. Once you’re looking you’ll could have more bones than you know what to do with. 

Until then, here is a guide to getting bones from the wild.

Where should I look?

  • Where there are live animals, there are dead animals. My favorite is a particular ranch/park, where there are maybe a few hundred head of cattle.
  • Even better, if you can find a specific place where animals congregate or live, like a badger sett, breeding ground, or nest, go there. 
  • Off the trail, or in less popular areas. I don’t think you’ll find too much at Half Dome.
  • Keep an eye out for fresh kills, by the side of the road or where vultures are circling. (Roadkill seems to be easier to come by, out of those two.) You can take home corpses and clean them yourself, or you can just come back next spring if it’s in an area that you don’t think would be disturbed.
  • For small bones, just look closely at the ground. When it comes to mouse and squirrel bones, the most common place for me to find them is just sitting in the dirt, waiting for my turn to climb the rock, or having a picnic.
  • In dry river and creek beds! This is where I find most of mine! The rain washes heavy objects down into river beds, so that is by far the best place to find bigger animal bones. I’ve also found hundreds of golf balls, dozens of tennis balls, a backpack, a helmet, a pager, and a hundred-dollar bill in and around creek beds.

Should I take these bones?

Legal: Officially, it is illegal to take vertebrate fossils from federal lands like national parks and forests. It is also illegal to be in possession of any part (even shed antlers or feathers) of any endangered animal. If the animal is not endangered and you are on your own private property then you can take whatever you want, even sell it. There are also state-by-state laws about their public lands and what you can and can’t take. Government websites don’t really have good information in an accessible format, like ever, so consider asking a ranger. Fish and Game has a lot of authority and can be extremely serious about their rules, especially in Canada; people go to jail for putting one two many fish in their car. That being said…do you think anyone will care, or know what you took from the middle of the under-staffed forest?

Of course you can take pictures though; it’s never illegal to take pictures in nature.

Health: They say animals carry diseases, so I’d use caution when handling something that still has flesh on it. But you know, wash your hands, and I think you should be good. If you’re concerned about touching a dead animal, consider that most people eat dead animals.

Other: If you’re going to take these bones just to have your squeamish roommates or anti-hoarder parents throw them away, think twice. I have visited the same animal several times and kind of regretted that my friends and I had taken some of the best bones with the misguided intent to make something out of them. But if you really do want that skull for your mantle piece, or that polydactylous paw for science class, then go for it. It will likely be overgrown with grass or buried in a muddy bank otherwise.

Tips

  • Learn to identify bones before you go out. Don’t just look for something white; cowpies turn white in the sun, too. Learn the shape and texture of bones first-hand. See them. Touch them. Smell them. Taste them.
  • Go when it’s cool out. You’re running/biking around in the sun, sometimes getting in awkward positions to get to that one under the root. Plus if it’s really cold you can wear pant and protect your legs from tall grasses. 
  • Treat bone hunting like a hike. Don’t do it just for the bones, do it for fun, to get in nature with your friends. A lot of bones I found just by virtue of running hundreds of miles in these parks; bones were always secondary to the run.
  • Where are dead animals, there are live animals. You know that they can be dangerous. And forget it if you think I’m just talking about carnivores. Cattle and some deer are much bigger than you, and they can and do kill people. I always cheese it real fast when a cow growls at me.

That’s all I’ve got! Add your own tips, maybe I’ll reblog this if enough people add their own. Happy hunting, you freak!

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